… when I took a look at Ed Bice’s slides for the AMTA Social Impact of MT Panel. Ed Bice is the founder of Meadan (ebice @ meadan.org), among many other things (his Pop web page).

hybrid distributed natural language translation (hdnlt) ‘web 2.0’ approach
• Language translation as a distributed service
• People/machines collaborate to provide service
• Volunteer translators as a social network
• Harness collective intelligence – value arises from small, shared
contributions
• Reputation driven – translator reputations adjusted by feedback
and performance
• Abstractions ease adding devices and services

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By Erick Schonfeld, Om Malik, and Michael V. Copeland

SOCIAL MEDIA

Incumbent To Watch: Yahoo!
Hoping to dominate social media, it’s gobbling up promising startups (Del.icio.us, Flickr, Webjay) and experimenting with social search (My Web 2.0) that ranks results based on shared bookmarks and tags.

MASHUPS AND FILTERS

Incumbent To Watch: Google
Already the ultimate Web filter through general search as well as blog, news, shopping, and now video search, it’s encouraging mashups of Google Maps and search results, and offers a free RSS reader.

THE NEW PHONE

For nearly a century, the phone, and voice as we know it, has existed largely in the confines of a thin copper wire. But now service providers can convert voice calls into tiny Internet packets and let them loose on fast connections, thus mimicking the traditional voice experience without spending hundreds of millions on infrastructure. All you need are powerful–but cheap–computers running specialized software. The Next Net will be the new phone, creating fertile ground for new businesses.

Incumbent To Watch: eBay (Skype)
The pioneer in the field and still the front-runner, Skype brings together free calling, IM, and video calling over the Web; eBay will use it to create deeper connections between buyers and sellers. [And I’d say Google Talk is following closely…]

THE WEBTOP

It’s been a long time — all the way back to the dawn of desktop computing in the early 1980s — since software coders have had as much fun as they’re having right now. But today, browser-based applications are where the action is. A killer app no longer requires hundreds of drones slaving away on millions of lines of code. Three or four engineers and a steady supply of Red Bull is all it takes to rapidly turn a midnight brainstorm into a website so hot it melts the servers. What has changed is the way today’s Web-based apps can run almost as seamlessly as programs used on the desktop, with embedded audio, video, and drag-and-drop ease of use. Company: 37Signals (Chicago)
What it is: Online project management
Next Net bona fides: Its Basecamp app, elegant and inexpensive, enables the creation, sharing, and tracking of to-do lists, files, performance milestones, and other key project metrics; related app Backpack, recently released, is a powerful online organizer for individuals.
Company: Writely (Portola Valley, CA)
What it is: Online word processing
Next Net bona fides: It enables online creation of documents, opens them to collaboration by anyone anywhere, and simplifies publishing the end result on a website as a blog entry.

UNDER THE HOOD

A growing number of companies are either offering themselves as Web-based platforms on which other software and businesses can be built or developing basic tools that make some of the defining hallmarks of the Next Net possible.

Incumbent To Watch: Amazon
It’s becoming a major Web platform by opening up its software protocols and encouraging anyone to use its catalog and other data; its Alexa Web crawler, which indexes the Net, can be used as the basis for other search engines, and its Mechanical Turk site solicits humans across cyberspace to do things that computers still can’t do well, such as identify images or transcribe podcasts.